windows-10

Ten Operating Systems that are way better than Windows 10

If you are anything like me, then you were convinced to upgrade (in my case just one of my computers) to Windows 10 from either Windows 7 or 8. You tried it and realized that it really sucks. So now you may be looking for another operating system to replace the bloated, spyware laden, advertisement drive, slow, weak, and ugly looking windows 10 that currently pollutes and weighs down your machine. If that is the case then check out a quick list of ten operating systems that are way better than Windows 10. These are presented in no particular order, and there are surely many more than just 10 operating systems that are better than windows 10 but this is just a quick list of alternatives for you to consider.

So, here goes the list:

Windows 7

windows7


Windows 7 was great when it first came out and it still is great in my opinion, in fact I still think that it is the ‘Best Windows Ever’. And it is still actively supported by Microsoft until at least 2020, which is coming up pretty quickly but that’s at least three more years of ‘Active Support’ left in it. Windows 7 still functions and looks better than Windows 8 or 10, in my opinion. So if you agree just revert back to Windows 7, and in the meantime, maybe Microsoft will work all the bugs and crap out of Windows 10. You can still download Windows 7 from Microsoft here: microsoft.com.

Ubuntu

Ubuntu Linux OS


Linux may seem a little intimidating to anyone switching from Windows at first, but after a little use it will become clear why Linux is such a popular choice for operating systems. It is very secure and stable, although it can have a tough learning curve. But if you are willing to learn something new it will be very rewarding. And if your are considering making the switch from Windows to Linux, Ubuntu is a great choice and a great starting place. For one thing it is very simple to learn and use, like windows. Also you can ‘try it’ on your computer (or any computer with a dvd/cd drive or usb port (if you have a usb thumbdrive your willing to format to try it), before you decide to install it. For more information about trying and/or using Ubuntu, visit: Ubuntu.com.

Mint Linux

Mint Linux OS


Linux Mint is another great choice for x-windows users, because it is based in part off of Ubuntu. However, it just looks better, in my opinion, but its basically the same ‘under the hood’. Linux Mint comes with a variety of ‘desktops’, such as KDE, Gnome, Mate, Cinnamon, and XFCE (check out my previous post to see a review of linux mint with the XFCE desktop), and each of these is fully customizable, meaning you can make Linux Mint look just about anyway that you would like. And like Ubuntu, Linux Mint has a solid support community behind it that can help with any trouble you may run into while installing or running it. You can also try it out before installing it, just like Ubuntu. You can download and/or learn more about Linux Mint at: linuxmint.com.

OSX (Any newer version)

OSX OS


Apples Macintosh OSX operating system has been around a long time now, and it is based on the ‘unix-like’ BSD operating system, which is very similar to Linux. OSX is proven to be secure and stable, at least much more than Windows. One downside to OSX is that in order to use it you will also need to buy Apple hardware (i.e. a laptop or desktop computer). Unless that is you are willing and able to attempt a ‘hackintosh’, that is running OSX on non-Apple, ordinary PC hardware, but be warned that the process of creating a ‘hackintosh’ machine is no easy feat. However, almost any recent version of OSX is way better than Windows 10, in my opinion, and is a good bet that you will enjoy it if you try it. You can find out more information about OSX at: apple.com.

Fedora Core Linux

Fedora Core Linux OS


Another good choice for beginning to learn Linux Operating System is Fedora Core Linux, which like other flavors of linux allows you to try it before installing it and it is similar to the other flavors of linux as well.

Mandriva Linux

Mandriva LInux OS


Another good choice for beginning to learn Linux Operating System is Mandriva Linux, which like other flavors of linux allows you to try it before installing it and it is similar to the other flavors of linux as well.

PC Linux

PC Linux OS


Another good choice for beginning to learn Linux Operating System is PC Linux, which like other flavors of linux allows you to try it before installing it and it is similar to the other flavors of linux as well.

AntiX Linux

AntiX Linux OS


Another good choice for beginning to learn Linux Operating System is AntiX Linux, which like other flavors of linux allows you to try it before installing it and it is similar to the other flavors of linux as well.

Open Suse Linux

Open SUSe Linux


Another good choice for beginning to learn Linux Operating System is Open Suse Linux, which like other flavors of linux allows you to try it before installing it and it is similar to the other flavors of linux as well.

CentOS Linux

CentOS Linux OS


Another good choice for beginning to learn Linux Operating System is CentOS Linux, which like other flavors of linux allows you to try it before installing it and it is similar to the other flavors of linux as well. CentOS is also a popular choice for webservers and cloud servers as well because of its performance and stability.




You really cant go wrong with any recent version of OSX or Linux, however this is a learning curve if you are coming over from Windows so be prepared to work at it and learn new things. Also there are many more flavors of Linux to try out, all the popular distributions of Linux can be compared and found at Distrowatch.com. But you will be rewarded with a new experience which promises to be better than your previous Windows experiences. In my opinion, Windows is getting steadily worse and not better, however, hopefully they will improve their operating systems in the near future……………….. We can only wait and see…………………………………………………………

Shane Zentz Hackintosh Desktop

Hackintosh Virtual Machine by Shane Zentz ~~~~~

I finally got a working Hackintosh vm working on my system, after a few tries and a lot of frustration…

Here is the screenshot:

Shane Zentz Hackintosh Desktop

Shane Zentz Hackintosh Desktop

This was possible mainly because of this post : http://lifehacker.com/5938332/how-to-run-mac-os-x-on-any-windows-pc-using-virtualbox by Whitson Gordon which explains how to install OSX Mountain Lion in Virtual Box. The installation did not go very smoothly but eventually I was able to get it up and running. Now I am setting my sights on creating a ‘real’ hackintosh on real hardware. I will post whatever progress (and problems) that I have with this project in the coming weeks………

Shane Zentz

Unlock God Mode in Windows 8

How to Unlock God Mode in Windows 8

by Shane Zentz

Cool Windows 8 Secrets and Tricks

Hi Everybody,
Last week I posted how to unlock ‘God Mode’ in Windows 7, and after some trial and error I have learned that the process is nearly the same in Windows 8. So just to review, God Mode is basically just a centralized administration center where all controls are displayed in one location. Just like in Windows 7, the process for opening god mode in windows 8 is very easy and straightforward. First just create a folder anywhere, I think that the desktop is the best place, but you can place it anywhere in Windows that you want. Next, just rename the folder (right click and rename) to:
GodMode.{ED7BA470-8E54-465E-825C-99712043E01C}

And then just like in Windows 7, the icon for the folder will change to a control panel icon. When you open the icon you will get a folder with every administration option available to the user, in other words ‘God Mode’ with complete control, or at least as much control as Windows will allow. So if you like to have one location to control just about anything that Windows 8 will allow you to control, then try to unlock the ‘God Mode’.

Thanks for reading this post!
Shane Zentz

What's New in Windows 8

What’s New in Windows 8

A Breif Review of Windows 8 by Shane Zentz

Windows 8 Contains some New Features along with Familiar Windows Features

The first thing I noticed when first using Windows 8 was the new Tiled Start Screen. This is a little unusual in an Operating System and was a little unexpected, but after using it for a while I found it intuitive and kind of cool. At first I was at a loss as to how to find the traditional desktop, and I suspect that a lot of Windows users will have the same experience. Once I figured out how to get to the traditional desktop, I felt like I was using Windows Operating System again. Except for one thing. Where is the Start Button? Try as I might I could not find the Start Button. I have to admit that this is one feature of Windows 8 that I really don’t like, and I think that it is a mistake to leave out the Start Button that all Windows users will expect (and want) to see. Once you get past the missing start button and the new way of getting to applications and the new way of doing tasks in Windows, there are some cool new features that are worth a mention.

One cool feature is that now Windows 8 comes with anti-virus software built in. This used to be called ‘Windows Defender’ and in the past it had to be manually installed by the user, but now it is installed by default. This is really a good feature that any Windows user will appreciate. Another new feature is the Windows App Store, where Windows users can get both free and paid Windows Apps. I have to admit that I haven’t spent that much time looking through the App Store but I would assume that most popular Windows Applications could be easily found and installed through the App Store. I will post an update to this post when I have more time to check this Windows App Store out.

Another feature of Windows 8 that sounds promising is the ‘One Click Restore’ feature, which is now called a ‘Refresh’. This is just like the ‘Restore’ function of previous versions of Windows, except that now it can be performed in just ‘One Click’. Also ‘Windows Explorer’ has been redisigned, but still functions much the same as all the previous versions of Windows Explorer, but it does look better.

Windows 8 has promised performance increases which I would welcome and I think that most Windows users would like as well. The better start up times and shut down times are something that Windows has needed for a long time. Both Mac OS and any version of Linux OS will blow older versions of Windows away when it comes to start up times and shut down times, but Windows 8 should be faster. I noticed a slight increase in start up and shut down times, but not anything like what has been promised.

Overall, I like some of the new features of Windows 8 and I am taking a wait and see attitude to see if it will live up to the hype and expectations. I still feel the need to complain about the lack of the traditional start button on the desktop, but all in all there are some cool new features in Windows 8.

Shane Zentz